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. >>> inflation tops the list for china's central bank chief. he's put off retirement to help oversee the economy. hello i'm yuko fukushima and this is "asia biz forecast." for many this past week the central focus was the central bank. the bank of japan welcomed a new chief and opened the door to a new era of monetary policy. haruhiko kuroda was sworn in wednesday as the new boj governor. he took over a day after masaaki shirakawa stepped down, kuroda bringing an end to more than a decade of inflation. prime minister shin bow abe it requires closer coordination between the government and the central bank as well as a boj chief willing to undertake bold monetary easing. by all accounts, kuroda is his man. >> translator: the japanese economy has been struggling with deflation for nearly 15 years. the greatest mission of the central bank is to end deflation and achieve the inflation target of 2% as soon as possible. >> cue row do da has said he believes the boj can achieve the target within two years and says he'll use every tool at his disposal to make that happen. >> translator: the bank of japan
, and the u.s. economy. from the federal reserve board here in washington this is just under an hour. >> the federal open market committee committed a two day meeting earlier today. as always my colleagues and i reviewed recent economic and financial developments and discuss the economic outlook. economic outlook. the data had been generally consistent with our expectation that the fourth quarter recovery would prove temporary and modern economic growth would resume. spending by households and businesses have continued to expand. sector has seen for gains. the jobs market has shown signs of improvement over the next six months. private payrolls are growing more quickly,hours of work have increased. the rate of findings and employment insurance has fallen. the unemployment rate has continued to dip down. at 7.7%, the rate remains elevated. thatmains a concern economic growth and job creation may be slow in coming months. theontinue to monitor recent increases in japanese prices. prices which seem to be due to factory shutdowns. apart from temporary variations, inflation is running som
economy and you look at the industrial revolution and the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by technology which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being in a constant feedback loop to the ability to trade stock in non-of seconds. millennials or at the forefront of that. we understand that is reality so other generations are running around saying how do we adapt then how do we move? how do we go forward in this fast-paced world and millennials are taking it all in stride because that is the reality of how we grow. it's also brought us a sense of ease and adaptability. it's brought us the ability to be resilient in the economic crisis which has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year could be totally different. we saw how quickly it started and we can see how quickl
and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. a great show for you today. first up, the question for the economy. should we save or should we spend? what will get the economy moving faster? i'll talk to the chief proponent of spending. nobel prize winning economist paul krugman. then, the race for space. is america losing? china is building its own space station and the u.s. has to rely on russia to send our astronauts up to the stars. what is going on? >>> and the exploding middle class. in more than seven years it will triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. >>> but, first, here's my take. those of you who follow the show reg lerly know i have long argued that cutting government spending in the midst of a weak recovery is not a path towards growth. but i have also argued that america does have a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is, the vast majority of our debt problems relate to the costs of health care in america. now that the debate over obama care is over, we should start thinking about how to get am
, the question for the american economy. should we save or spend? what will get the economy moving faster. i will talk to the chief pro-economist of spending paul krugman and then the race for space, is america losing? china is building it own space station and the u.s. has to reeli on russia to send our astronauts to the stars. what's going on? and the exploding issue, middle class. in seven years it will more than triple in size to almost 2 billion people. it will change the world. we'll talk about how. but first here's my take. those of you who followed the show regularly know that i have long argued that cutting government spending if the midst of a weak recovery is not a path toward growth. i have also argued that america has a debt and deficit problem and we need to take it very seriously. the fact is that the vast majority of our problem is related to the cost of health care in america. now the debate over obama care is over, we should start to think seriously of how to get america's health care costs under control. as it turns out a book and magazine story provide ways to think of th
companies are doing well and the economy is starting to look up, but there's no denying this it rally is in large part fuelled by the fed, which has kept interest rates so low you can't make money anywhere other than the housing and stock markets. the stock market is lot more liquid than housing. to help prop up the down economy, the fed has been pumping money into the system every month in exchange for bonds. that increases the money supply. it drives down interest rates. for awhile now, the fed funds rate, which is the benchmark for loans americans use to raise money, has been at near zero. the hope is that banks and other lenders will use this cash to lend to consumers and businesses. borrowers will take advantage of the lower interest rates to buy homes and perch cars and start new businesses and get the economy churning again. it's been working. home prices are rising again due to low mortgage rates. more americans are finding jobs again. but fed says it won't stop printing money until the unemployment rate dips below 6.5%, which means the fed's probably going to be at it until 2
safe financial move it could hurt young adults and economy as a whole. brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i guess it's a story here is that young people are avoiding debt and not getting sort of themselves mixed up in some of these predatory practices that young people have been the target in the past. so had a part of the story is good, right? >> absolutely. during the great recession everybody stopped using their credit cards but particularly those under 35. especially undergraduates as you brought up. in a sense that is good, whenever you hear from a personal financial expert, get some extra money, pay off your credit card debt, but having no credit and misusing credit are two different things and could have potentially difficult implications for our economy and for these young adults. >> rick: i remember my mother telling me, go and get one credit card, buy something you need but get your books and put it on the card and then pay it off in full. that is the way to start establishing a good credit? >> who is your mom. eileen -- that is good advice to your son. that is exact
when the economy is struggling? >> i agree 100% with you. there is no creativity at all. >> i like the show even more all the time. [laughter] neil: thank you, guys. thank you very much. in the meantime, what is jimmy fallon getting that has a guy named mitch saying my goodness look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways openor 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, u get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side
. it is isolated its economy is in dire straits its leadership is divided. and its position in the region and the world has only grown eaker. i do believe that all of us have an interest in resolving this issue peacefully. trong and principled diplomacy is the best way to ensure that the iranian government foresakes nuclear weapons. peace is far more preferable to war and the inevitable cost the unintended consequences that would come with war means that we have to do everything we can to try to resolve this diplomatically. because of the cooperation between our governments we know that there remains time to pursue a diplomatic solution. that's what america will do with clear eyes working with a world that's united and with the sense of urgency that's required. but iran must know that time is not unlimited. and i've made the position the united states of america clear. iran must not get a nuclear weapon. this is not a danger that can be contained. and as president i said all options are on the table for achieving our objectives. america will do what we must to revent a nuclear-armed iran.
-year slowdowns in the economy. we had it in 2010, 2011, 2012. everyone is on the lookout for it again. i think what the fed has been doing represents a key difference between those three years and now, because then we had stopping and starting with qe. you had end dates. so you had the market in anticipation of ending and then wondering whether they were going to pick it back up again. because this is open-ended, i think the fuel that it provides is longer lasting and represents a key difference in part of the reason why i think we'll avoid this fourth consecutive slowdown. >> heidi, the other big story of the week is cyprus, of course. cyprus a tiny company. a big banking system that is a big percentage of the gdp of that tiny country. so how does this play out? how do you think this gets resolved? and should we worry about an impact in the united states? >> well, we definitely shouldn't worry that it's going to impact the united states, because we have different rules here. what happened in cyprus is europe likes drama. it's the birthplace of opera. it has the birthplace of a lot of forms of
. >> for years and years and years. what does it mean to our economy? >> what it means to our economy, the lawmakers, what gaur gary b is correct. voters are not against this, voters are against this. and like trying to find the bravest frenchman, it's tough to find an honest one out there. >> and this is by the way-- >> and this is the entire french vote and i don't care how. >> they don't want this. >> and here is the difference, here is the difference. >> and one thing about this is, even if everybody in the world is doing it, it is still wrong. congress comes out and says, we don't want pork and they also said we're going to stand up for simpson bowls and cut spending and raiserevenue, we can't do that. they all say they're against pork and every single one of them do it, it's a systemic problem and it's a character problem that we have indeed seen and it means these guys are not doing it for our country. >> john, one thing, take a breath for god's sake. the issue here is that if jonas got, you know, the extra bonus coming early. taxpayers weren't paying for it. in this situation,
. you look at wal-mart, for example, right? and your h're not seeing it-- >> the moving service economy which unions have. >> go ahead, adam. >> charlie was making an interesting point and i think i can help him here because the deal you said earlier, why why don't unions give in to the weight of the private sector employees have given in. well, the fact of the matter is. a lot of people watching this understand that. those benefits aren't very good sometimes so i don't fault the union leadership for saying-- >> private sector on everything from health care, to-- >> and we don't want our members to-- >> well, guys, here let me finish. a thousand jobs, a thousand workers, the private sector guys getting screwed for the jobs or you could have a hundred guys getting lavish benefits because that's all the company can afford. >> and what about the numbers, charles. >> what we're forgetting that we as taxpayers fund at least in the case of the public union members, their benefits. their incredibly generous benefits compared to ours. we're paying for them. we fork over the money and pay the bi
's economy after a week on the brink of disaster. talks have significantly overrun, adding to fears that the deal is far from certain. we will go live to brussels in a moment. >> president nicos anastasiades left of cyprus behind for a chilly brussels. he is trying to broker a deal with eu finance ministers by monday to secure aid for his beleaguered country. his eu colleagues are demanding the cyprus raise the sum of 5.8 billion euros itself in order to release a rescue loan package. a compulsory levy on savings may be the only answer. but major investors in cyprus's biggest bank, the bank of cyprus, could lose up to 20% of their deposits. not surprisingly, it's an unpopular measure. >> nearly everyone's going to lose some money. of course, the amount will be greater for some than for others. and that's that. >> there is anger at the nation's creditors. >> the germans are only interested in themselves. they don't care about anyone else. >> cyprus's banks have been closed for a week. the european central bank has threatened to cut off the island's emergency funding should no deal be
this is going to benefit the country or the economy. >> wayne is the first person to repeat this over and over. panelsy pelosi said let's pass so it we can read it. they don't even know the definition of a full time employee yet. is this woman full time? she doesn't know. all she knows is she's probably not gettingealth care. >> before you answer that, i'm holding a copy of the u.s. constitution in my hand which i carry with me at all times. i page through this time and time again and i can't find anywhere in it that says government can require me to purchase something. >> well, eric, it's unfortunate. the government is -- it's a fashous government. they cans for you to do anything they want to. why we're celebrating something that is a horror like obama care is hond me. you're talking about a birthday, i'll tell you what. birthday you see this cookie, well, the cookie crumbles. see. that's what happens. because it's not worth anything. and they should turn around and get rid of it. >> we're laughing but the economy really rests on health care. 16 or 17% of the economy. if this fails this is a
at home, what do we do about our economy so we don't become a cyprus isn't senate passed its first real bottoming proposal in more than four years. but many americans are worried that lawmakers are kicking the can down the road. the majority say they are slightly less nervous about the economy than they were in 2010. an overwhelming number of us think the number-1 challenge to our economy is the continuing, mounting debt. we have a former media spokesperson for george w. bush and a democratic political consultant to hillary clinton for president. mersaides and richard, welcome to both of you. americans are sick of this. look at the debt clock this. thing keeps whizzing up. the debt is mounting. every sunday, i show this. it has gone up another trillions, it seems, theres and multi-millions. mercedes, how do we stop that in its tracks and make it go the other way? >> we can't stop it when you have the budget plan that senator murray has pushed through. 50 of all, because it has such little support from american voters. for example, we saw a poll saying that only 28% of likely voters sup
investors are among the foreign investors in the economy? there must be significant bank deposit losses. the program must tackle the problem at the root. sure that thee plan is in place without dipping cyprus into debt and on sustainability. cyprus has agreed to close down its second-biggest bank, but once to hold on to the biggest. perhaps the biggest problem is the imf and germany, but to be fair they said no, they want to close the bank, even if it means thousands of job losses. >> the syrian forces are reported to have been firing at each other in the highest. the cat -- an informant captured, missiles with ammunition from the base being taken. it is near a highway to the capital. the same base was captured after two weeks of heavy fighting. the arab league has given the syrian seek to the opposition council. one of many countries to recognize them as the legitimate representatives of the syrian people. we are just the sight of the meeting. >> the meeting is ongoing, but i can say that an arab official attended based on the seats from the syrian national coalition. remember in march
in three months and that would be the major comptroller of european all legal and economy. they would expose the company is about how the standard oe executives for supporting the nazis piece of meat headlines and lead to congressional investigations. the columnists would benefit by getting a lot of juicy items. in his letters he details how he met with landrieu pearson and he exchanged these items and bragged that he became so close to drew pearson in particular that he became regarded as one of the family. in his role as a propagandist, dahl started to make a name for himself in washington and his short stories started earning him quite a bit of a claim as a young writer and one of them and particular, sort of particularly affecting the young fable that he wrote for children and was published in the ladies' home journal was about a little gremlins that tinkered with the ref pilot planes to arouse sympathy for the british ref pilots. a particularly appealed to eleanor roosevelt who read the story to her grandchildren and in short order invited to the white house for dinner eleanor ro
popular. you have very high unemployment. you have a very weak economy. it was interesting that in the obama recovery, family income went down to $2,500 a year, where during the recession, income went down $1,500 a year. families were doing worse, yet in the campaign, obama ran an extremely good campaign, and he won despite his disadvantages and he won frankly in a predictable way. he made the election about his opponent. the romney people allowed obama to define romney. this was rather than romney defining romney, and that is why it is important for republicans to look back and say, what did we do wrong? the idea that the republican party is in some terrible shape -- certainly i do not buy that. i have seen terrible shape. i remember watergate, i remember when the 13% of americans identified themselves as republicans, and the national chairman appointed people to see if we should change the name of the party. for 40 years, the most number of republicans in the house was 192. today we have 230 something, and it is absolutely right to figure out what you did wrong, and the o
increases, even some stimulus money to try to get the economy going. but it's significant that they're fighting at a lower level of intensity and turmoil. notice that the congress left for easter break without a crisis over a government shutdown. there was no crisis over potential debt limit, and government default earlier this year. could come back this summer but so long as it lasts, that's calming for the markets and good for the economy, and it may, lester, leave some space still for a compromise in which democrats would agree to changes in cuts in medicare and social security, and republicans would come up with a little bit more tax revenue, lester. >> all right, john harwood tonight, thank you. >>> president obama wrapped up his four-day visit to the middle east today, after helping israel and turkey end a three-year diplomatic dispute. that, in turn, will help the region deal with the civil war in syria. before he left today, the president turned his attention to the past, visiting jordan's ancient city of petra, one of the world's most celebrated archaeological sites. with t
new people and reunite with loved ones. critical to our economy. one out of eight american jobs depends in one way or another on travel and tourism. expected to goe to more than 230 ballot -- $230 billion in 2014. our country has benefited greatly from airline inegulation since that began 1978. government control of this industry has had unfortunate results. in the years since deregulation air fares have dropped substantially and options for travelers have expanded. these benefits are the result of free-market competition and will continue as long as the industry remains robust and competitive. despite the positive benefits of deregulation, the story of the islines in recent decades not one of unbroken success. fuel costs have led to a succession of airline bankruptcies. as federal agencies have provided assistance and assume responsibility for many pension plans, the financial stability of the airline industry is one of special concern. to help cope with changing circumstances, airlines have turned to consolidation. in the last decade alone we have than sixewer significant airl
that the economy is not growing. all wee doing is spending more money for the things that we buy and so it's a charade, a facade. looks like we're growing, but we're contracting. i think that's going to get worse as time goes on. shibani: fueled by money printing. peter, aays great to have you on. thank you very much for joining us today. >> you're welcome. shibani: switching gears and giving lou dobbs a chance of this. if the tiny med trainian island collapses, does it take the entire eurozone with it? i saw you taking notes. i know you want to jump in here, thghts on what peter said? >> peter, i always enjoy listening to his perspective on e world. he said that cypress, you know, could happen anywhere. he did later acknowledge it was an extreme example of banking and sovereignty gone wrong. here's the reality. cypress i now learning th it made serious mistakes. it tried to take the eurozone, the european commission, the international monetary fund and the e. cb to the brink. they play ad like fools. that's how they got in this position. they were reminded of that by the russians who reje
the economy has been so weak. >> what about food and gas prices? >> one thing is the defined benefit lifetime retirement program. those are gone. so you are not -- you just don't have enough money if you're retiring to live off of it, and the government is now broke, in effect. they can't step in and make this up. >> how much are they paying down in the government debt? >> well, the government debt is actually not going down, if i may say. so we are going to have a deficit this year of a trillion 300 billion dollars which is $25 billion a week. it's the worst deficit that we've had, and nobody knows. >> social security is easy to fix. you lift the cap right now if >>> predictions. pat. >> immigration reform passes the house. republicans kill it in the senate. >> eleanor. >>next state to legalize gay marriage. >> what state? >> illinois. >> susan. >> immigration reform is going to run into big trouble in congress. >> really. mort. >> what i think the economy is going to remain >>> i predict that president abi of japan trying to revitalize his economy by loosening its grip on inflation will ove
economies. its involvement in asia will be a welcomed addition. the u.s. must work with india to reduce her domestic constraints to growth and inagrees foreign direct investment. reducing red tape, increasing the supply of electricity, improving the tax system, strengthening the ability to enforce contracts will all lift india's ranking and spur business growth in a way that has been missing thus far. largelyia's economy is based on global supply chains, it is absolutely critical for india to enact reforms and liberalize its economy, to tap into this regional market. this is how india anchors itself in the asia-pacific region and we should do what we can to help leverage those reforms inside india. that is why i believe the administration must redouble its efforts to secure a u.s.india bilateral investment treaty. current negotiations are proceeding far too slowly. there are important issues to resolve and it's going to take a concerted effort to make progress, but once the b.i.t. is firmly in place, the u.s. should work with india on a free trade agreement that will foster more trade. we s
to the economy generally to gun control. you know, just on gun control there's been a lot of things that have been happening over just even the past few weeks. i was in colorado a couple weeks ago, and it's the first time i've kind of heard of a white house getting involved in the passage of state legislation where the big news when i was there was, apparently, vice president joe biden had just been calling up members of the state legislature there kind of lobbying them, saying that if they voted the right way, the president would help campaign for them this next year, and if they voted the wrong way, they may end up facing primary opponents. and according to legislators i talked to there, there was about seven democrats who had switched their votes enough to get four gun control bills through the statehouse. so there's a lot of things tar happening right now. -- that are happening right now. but what i'd like to try to start off with is the general issue of health care, because i think we've had the best health care system in the world, and i'm just going to briefly go through some of the ch
long has been considered generous because new york's economy and demographic contours different from those the rest of the country. there is a country growing more diverse and independent as income and inequality sigh rockets, more americans find themselves working low wage service jobs, looking more and more like new york. many of the political problems we are grappling with, immigration, minimum wage, what the repost-recession economy should look like, policy, policing, are issues at the center of new york's mayoral race. my great pleasure to have with me four of the democratic candidates for mayor of the new york city, bill de blasio. sal albanese, former city councilman. bill thompson, former new york comptroller and nominee for mayor in 2009. john liu, current city comptroller. we reached out to christine quinn who is also running but could not join us today. gentlemen, thank you very much for being here. >> thank you. >> this trial, i think, is -- really explosive. and i thinks that really changed the contours the politics on this issue. i'm curious what your feeling is about w
below 50%, basically even now with republicans on the economy, even though he had a big advantage after the election. >> look, when you're in the business of trying to form a compromise, get the other side to even come to the table with some commonsense ideas, i'm not surprised that the president is a little lower than 50%. but, you know, we have a budget now, we have a moral document, a blueprint for the policy debates that are going to take place this summer. one of the interesting things that i enjoyed watching was at 2:00 a.m., is that we got a chance to -- i don't get those other channels, george. but, they had an opportunity to talk about the keystone pipeline, they had an opportunity to talk about a biannual budget. this gave the senators more than an opportunity to talk about big issues as well as the budgetary. >> scored a lot of political points with all of those amendments. >> they did. and while this is a normal piece of legislative business, one does wonder why they did it at 5:00 in the morning? but it is a good thing they got it done. >> you're nodding your head? >> yes,
similar philosophy and economic programs created a thriving state economy where 1.4 million new net jobs were added during his time in office. there are other fundamentally important issues where the two men match. stemming the rise of health care, school choice, and as i'm sure we'll hear this morning, addressing the issues involving immigration that affecting -- that affect all of us. issues that continue to resonate as important topics in the our lives, ones in which governor bush has demonstrated much-needed leadership today. it is for these and many other reasons that jeb bush stands a as the only republican governor in the history of the state of florida to be reelected to office. he hails from a family that has gone out of their way to extend warmth and support to mrs. reagan, and all of us at the reagan library over the years. let us extend that warmth to him. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming governor jeb bush. [applause] >> very kind. really honored to be here. [applause] whoo, thank you. thank you all so much. ambassador, great seeing you. thank you so much. it
it again. cyprus is only the third smallest economy in the euro zone. if it has to devalue its currency, then do we have a domino fall and a fall in other places, spain, italy, and then do we see the whole thing going over with greece and the rest? >> and impacts us, and people may begin to take some of their money out of stocks here at home. >> what happens, people flee, basically, to quality. the dollar go up and treasuries being bought and see people getting out of risky things such as stocks. >> harris: you're the silver lining person on fox report weekend. you always find it for us and say later on in the week no matter what happens, if we feel a hiccup, if we don't, because of this week and cyprus and european problems over there, we have some good news coming? >> plenty to move the markets this week, and we have news on housing, both on prices and pending home sales and prices across the country and he we also have consumer confidence which has been quite high. so the housing rebound is something that's been pushing the bulls and they have been very resilient. we've seen them run
growth but the duty is even low-skilled immigrants are good for this economy. they are benefiting not just people like me or people working in washington d.c. because they know their lawn, watched their children but this is not the zero sum game and the data is clear it is a no-brainer. john: of the immigrant pains my house we are richer? >> yes. because he is cheaper e makes construction and prices lower for all of us. john: adits minder standing everything cost less and we get richer. >> to focus on the gdp if we would provide amnesty to 12 million in legal immigrants yes a total sum of products manufactured would grow. >> the more people in the bigger it gets but it is abstract but it doesn't mean anything for the public because if you find a the government with low-end jobs gdp is rising but opportunities for meaningful growth are eroding. john: what would you do with the 12 million who are here? >> you remove them as identified by law and allow them to leave voluntarily. if we have the incentives in place they would self to port with attrition john: make it so hard they leav
or the economy. this is something that will come up again with the debt ceiling fight this summer. but if you look at what the senate just passed, this is as christina said, they want to raise taxes. >> guys, let's switch to gun control here. christina, there's mention of the push for the gun control measures. a new gun control law was signed into law described as tough but does not ban semiautomatic assault weapons. here's the governor today. >> i get the feeling right now around assault weapons is that it's hard to define what assault weapons is, whether the ten-year ban, the federal ban made a difference. >> so colorado can't pass a ban on semiautomatic assault weapons. do you take that as a sign it's not going to pass in any state? >> well, it's really hard to know. every state is different. but there is a huge question here. lawmakers feel a lot of pressure from gun lobbyists, gun rights groups and this is why the effort is so interesting. he says he's going to spend $12 million to really look at senators that might be persuadable, particularly those with strong gun rights cultures in th
that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right? so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question
people, but the economy, that was a glimpse of the kinds of effects that you could create with a cyberattack. that is why it has our attention. >> that is why individual industries, and given the potential, had preemptive action today. >> senator, i think that this set some standards and goals. we have identified the correct relationships between commercial and private and government. .. is the one single threat to their talk to was a lot about an oscar for our help. in the wayave much about capability right now. >> thank you. general kelly, one of your major efforts is narcotics. i presume you are seeing huge pressures as naval forces are withdrawn because of budget pressures. also, can you comment on the role of the coast guard? even though it is not the jurisdiction of this committee, i predict it takes a very large role, too. that could degrade your ability to respond to narcotics. degrade. >> i think i plan to grow on their life in that part of the world. we are ensuring that they hip and shoulder to shoulder. as you say with a secret regime, i occupy a seat that is b
it comes to budget discussions and making sure that we have a thriving local economy. people choose to live in the outer sunset for a certain quality of life and i hope that i can contribute my part to ensure that people
. jennifer nelson began working with me four years ago and through some downturns in the economy ended up having to leave and take a different job, was making pretty darn good money. and a year ago december jennifer approached me and said, i hate my job. she says, but i loved the nonprofit. so, jennifer. [laughter] >> please come up. (applause) >> this wouldedthctionv have happened without her. and phoenix is going to be 2013 or 2014 graffiti international. thank you, graffiti fighters. (applause) >> it's cocktail time. [laughter] ... >> hi, i'm with building san francisco. and we have a special program of stay safe today where we're going to talk about what you can do to your home after an earthquake to make it waterproof and to be more comfortable. we're here at spur in san francisco, this wonderful exhibit of safe enough to stay. and this is an example of what your home might be like after an earthquake. and we have today with us ben latimer from tvan. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> we'll talk about things you can do you don't have to be a professional contractor to make yo
in the local economy of the area, but even more strikingly, because during her lifetime and during jesus' lifetime, mag dala became a service community for the larger city called tiber just which has been bill by the governor and which was known for its uncleanness. >> after jesus died he was buried in the fume and mary magdalene was the first within a group of women. >> exactly. >> to go to visit the tomb and. >> to anoint his body. >> was that the first anointing? >> had is not the first anointing that she's involved with, but it is the first after his death. >> she anointed christ's body twice, while he was alive and while he was dead. >> exactly. >> other women were with mary when she visited the tomb according to the gospels? >> their names vary from gospel to gospel. had is agreement there were other women involved. >> other women in jesus' life. >> quie clearly. his group of disciples probably totalled about 30 and they included both men and women. >> how many women? >> we can't say because the breakdown is not given to us. however, i would estimate we are dealing with about a doz
you are voting for unemployment in an economy that as a terrible recession why vote for unemployment vote for employment no more hoover cabs no more mustache cabs. thank you sir. thank you very much have a nice day. >> applause. >> jacob, novak, robyn low. >> good afternoon. united taxi cab workers first i want to say that the confusion around these meetings is really doing a lot of harm. our taxi newsletter was obsolete before it came back from the printer the flyers that we made for the meeting are did destined for the garbage. i can't see how you can good forward at this point with any kind of a coherent decision until we know what's going to happen with uber and side car and lift the california public utilities commission currently has a proceeding going on supposed to term innate 6 months from the time it started which would be 2 months from the time that you know this hearing is going to take place and we are facing an un limited number of vehicles providing the same service that we are and if they get a green light from the state -- they are already going full speed ahea
economy on the verge of bankruptcy. at the meeting earlier, he was being slightly more diplomatic. >> we are here to find a solution this evening. it must the global, it must be fair. it is important that we are in a position to help cyprus handle is financial systems, which involves serious restructuring and controls. the eurozone is doing its bit with its $10 billion -- 10 billion euro loan. it must not only be global, but fair. lows not fair to hit the income savings. >> all the talking going on in brussels among all the politicians, the banking, financial leaders, people in cyprus are extremely concerned to know exactly what is going to happen to the future of their country. >> they must be watching all of this very nervously indeed. there were earlier some optimistic noises coming out of cyprus. they were saying they were making significant progress. i have not heard the word significant used here, though i have heard a college meant that progress has been made. -- an acknowledgment that progress has been made. against cyprus, it's time to pray. for many in this deeply orthodox coun
-- there is some younger prince who tries to open up a bit and revive the economy. the risk of that is, it produces a backlash among the conservatives who don't want more change and openness and opportunity for women, which they see as the road to ruin if you're like my friend, lulu. and if you got a religious backlash come you could obviously have the quote modernizers, and that does not mean westernized. modernizers. react to that backlash. the third is getting a leader who decides that the way to control this is to revert to the excessive religiosity of the '80s and '90s, after the attack on the mecca mosque in 1979, the saudi king basically turned the country over to the religious fundamentalists. and 20 years of that bread of the terrorists that produced 911. so saudis understand that, but, and say that it could happen again, but it, it's hard to entirely rule out. the fourth option is obviously some kind of chaos that leads to collapse, sparked by something like in tunisia like the young man burning himself to death. saudis are very passive, but they also, young people at least, increasingly
. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> everyone knows cable news more opinionated but journalism substantial differences between the news channels. the study finds 85%. approach is obvious to anyone who watches. >> three months after newtown and eight months after the aurora, colorado, shootings in that theater. time to do something. tonight i'm urging you call to your members of congress. >> fox mews, by contrast, 55% opinion and cnn is the only one of the three, according to this study too, air more reporting, 54%, than opinion at 46%. so, gail shister, is that because it's the cheapest? >> it's a lot cheaper to be spout off than it is to actually report it. the thing that gave me pause about the study and i have great respect for pew is how they deaf renshia differentiated between reporting because you can argue that reporting forms opinion and where do you draw the line? i wasn't sure it was in the content analysis that they did for the study. dubious about what was opinion, what was news. no questio
did he do? can you elaborate? >> well, he began thinking about the issue of corruption and the economy and political life in the 1990s when argentina was going through an historic economic meltdown. basically he drew the conclusion that corruption was in some ways the worst kind of sin. his argument is that most sinners at least carry the hope for forgiveness because on some level they recognize they're doing something wrong, whereas people who were on the take who have been bought off feel like they've won the lottery. in this book, it was his attempt to sort of puncture their conscience and say, look. this idea of pursuing individual gain at the expense of the common good is only going to carry you so far and eventually whether it is in this life or the next, you're going to have to answer for this behavior. it is a position that was of course very close to him, near and dear to his heart because of this situation in argentina. i would expect it is going to continue to be a mayor theme of his papacy. >> will it give us insight into how this new pope will deal with say corruption or e
be busy at home with economy. it was a clear reason and one of the many reasons why he chose her as suggested it because he knew she could do that for him on a daily basis in all, around the world. that's what i think that she would bring to him and accurate reading of where things stood. what she could deliver to him in terms of moving forward, where the players were when it comes to libya, for example. deliver to him what was needed for him to make the decision. she lost some battles but she certainly influenced a lot of decisions. libya being one of them. and asia definitely. >> host: we would get to libya next. it was a very interesting scenario in what happened there. but just one last question on the israeli-palestinian conflict. i was covering aipac 210100 clinton spoke at the conference. she mentioned at the time something that i thought was interesting. she said that far-flung destinations in the conflict where she would be traveling, that issued its took him up as the first, second or third issue. it struck me as unlikely, other than europe, that people would be focusin
and career change, fidelity is there for your personal economy, helping you readjust your retirement plan along the way. rethink how you're invested. and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices to help you fine-tune your personal economy. call today and we'll make it easy to move that old 401(k) to a fidelity no-fee ira. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. >>> this morning, it's time to talk tech with mario's top three. today's digital lifestyle contributor, mario armstrong, has rounded up the biggest stories of the week in the world of gadgets, apps, and social media. mario, good morning. >> good morning. >> quickly show the socks. very socks. very cool. let's move on. march madness -- >> yes. >> -- you can't always sit in front of your tv. >> no. >> you want to check your bracket, you have great ways to do it. >> there's an app that's free, march madness live, so you can watch
revenue-neutral tax reform we want to say, we want to leave more money in the economy and reduce taxes. when ronald reagan did it we had 7% growth in one year and that is the bold leadership we need but it's not a new principle. we don't have to reinvent ourselves in that way but we have to stand on principle and unless you stand for something people are not motivated to vote for you. >> chris: let's talk about what you stand about, immigration. you came out with your ideas for a comprehensive plan this week and since then you are taking fire from both the right and the left. you call your plan for creating a legal status. not citizenship, but a legal status, for the 11 million folks who are already here, illegal immigrants who are here but taking fire from the right because you oppose the e-verify system which would make it easier for employers to check whether their workers are in fact legal or illegal. why would you oppose that? >> that's not the main part of my plan. the main part is trust but verify, we have to have border security and conservatives always wanted border security b
a banking collapse that could impact other world economies. right now the european union chief is trying to get a last-minute deal together. >>> on tuesday and wednesday the u.s. supreme court will hold hearings on same-sex marriage challenges. proposition 8 and the defense of marriage act. people are already camping out mere the supreme court in washington to get in to the hearings. on thursday, we will find out which cars get a world car award. winner in power categories announced at the new york international auto show. shout-outs go to best all-around, best performance, green cars, and best design. that's going to do it for me. see you throughout the week p much more straight ahead with don lemon. >>> no golf for you. i want to you take a look at this. this is a pga course in orlando where tiger woods was leading before mother nature put the smackdown on it. the weather is severe in many parts of the country today. ridiculous storms here. blizzard there. live from snowy dayton, ohio in just a moment. speaking of tiger, if he wins tomorrow, he will be the new number one golfer in the
technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. twe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investmeninformation, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. understanding you clearly... what is the capital of zimbabwe ? ... the first time you ask with the google voice search. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid recognition. droid powerful. lou: the first major legal battle -- in an arizona federal court attorneys for five illegal immigrants argue they are eligible to remain in the united states than they are challenging the legality of the state government. as jim never were denies licenses the state says deportation does not confer the lawful status if it does not entitle them to public benefits the judge said he will issue a ruling over the next few weeks. my next guest am are with us. good to have you. there are only three states in the union in mexico, washington, utah tha
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